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by theologians and philosophers of religion. insofar as the present is the product of the past, any adequate historical accounts must be able to pay attention to antics lang all of these claims. the modern liberal institutions variously characteristic of all contemporary western states permit this ideological heterogeneity through the legal and political protection of individual citizens to believe and live as they please so long as they obey the established laws. so that is what needs to be accounted for. these institutions in the ideologicideologic al heterogeneity that they bring. the book's explanation of how the past became the present question says mark mentions many widely held assumptions. the reason is simple. typical narratives, common conceptions of change over time and ordinary historical methodologies cannot answer the book central question. they fail to do justice to the full range of moral and metaphysical commitment encompassed under the first-person plural, we. when it is used inclusively have all present-day europeans and the americans. who are we? we should not underestima
religion across the board has suffered in recent decades. but i think what's amazing and inspiring about this new pope is, you know, he's really breathing new life into the catholic conversation in a way we haven't seen in quite some time. i think his emphasis on personal humility, is connecting with people in their hearts in a way we haven't seen in quite some time. >> father john what is this pope francis effect? how would you explain it? >> i think at the time he was elected and announced at the loggia at st. peter's he seemed very shy and he is truly a charismatic figure. somebody in francis he doesn't just talk about the faith, he truly lives it. you see the things that have gone viral, when he goes and he embraces a man who is disfigured from an illness that causes boils, when he stands with a young boy, it's almost like jesus would let the children come to me. those things go viral and i think it sends a message that this pope is really someone who talks about jesus christ and acts like jesus christ. and there's an attraction and power to that. and i think people are very hungry f
, when politics and religion collide. >> i'm not ashamed to say that i believe in god and i believe until his word. this is my compass, my north star. >> the national republican senate committee criticizing arkansas's senator, democrat mark pryor, for that new ad campaign, but it's pryor's republican opponent who's coming to his defense. we'll talk about this ad with first read. vo: it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare since i've been using crest pro-health, i've noticed a huge improvement. [ male announcer ] go pro. for a clean that's up to four times better, try these crest pro-health products together. the toothpaste is really awesome. it cleans a lot. [ male announcer ] crest pro-health protects not just some, but all these areas dentists check most. this is
a christmas carol. i mean, someone. why? are they that bitter against religion? is that what it is? did they have a bad experience with organized religion? is it bitterness? >> well, i don't want to psycho analyze atheist activists who do prioritize that, but what i will say is that i think that the separation of church and state is in place to insure that the government does not privilege one religion over any other. it does not endorse any one religion over any other. so, my feeling on christmas displays in public spaces, in public schools is that if those are there, there should be displays for many different religions and many nonreligious -- >> i don't think many people have a beef with that. i don't think -- not in my crew. >> no -- >> nobody has a beef with that. >> i would hope not, yeah. yeah, exactly. >> i mean, we don't like, we don't like -- >> i mean, look -- >> i have to amend this. there are two things that have come up, one in the capital of washington state, in olympia. there were some atheist groups who said if you have a christmas tree, i'm going to put up an obnoxiou
thing than the religion of islam which is practiced by so many people in some way different ways more than a billion people in the world. but i think this misunderstanding of the nature of the threat of the ideology of islamism the human rights of muslim heritage themselves persist today. i would argue and see this at the moment in the press coverage of what is happening in countries like egypt. doing this kind of work on the front lines without international support, without international comprehension of the challenge that you face is an incredibly lon lonely endeav. i have seen this firsthand. as a lawyer told me back in december 2012, at a time when entire northern half of her country was under jihadists occupation, she said international solidarity is very helpful. when you live such a crisis alone, it is much more difficult to bear. what my book is really about is trying to break this wall of loneliness and silenced by connecting the people who are doing these struggles on the ground, the people around the world who stand for similar values of tolerance and equality and against
. >> it's a religion? >> no. it's false. >> true or false, masons were behind the american revolution? >> false. false. >> what about on the dollar bill the pyramid, that's masonic, right? >> everybody says -- in fact it's a common place in the ancient century. >> true, free mase sons laid the cornerstone of america well at least some of it's most iconic structures. what is freemasonry? >> simply put the oldest and largest fraternity. it's membership of who's who of world history. george washington, benjamin franklin, winston churchill, mozart, franklin radios vealed. henry ford, john wayne, even colonel sanders. if you want to be a mason you can petition a local lodge for membership. you'll need to demonstrate good characters and belief in some sort of supreme being. oh, in almost all lodges, it's men only. next you're up for a vote from grand master james sullivan. >> the lodge votes to accept you then you have the three degree, is that you go through. >> once you earn the third degree, yes, that's where the phrase comes from, you can join any number of masonic off shoot. he's a deg
. >> sarah, our resident religion expert at the table, you have a religious unpopular -- >> i have a related unpopular opinion to sahil's, which is that politicians should stop talking about religion, god and the bible. >> so -- >> people would be less -- public polly would icy would be less on -- >> why is in no safe zone in politics? >> 20% of the american public is not affiliated with a particular religion. there is a smaller segment of those who are atheist than agnostic. still, as he points out, it is kind of amazing that given the rise in the number of american atheists and nonbelievers there is not a single one in the u.s. congress and that it would be poison to run and openly declare you're an atheist. look at mark pryor's ad where he talked about the bible and he doesn't have all the answers, only god has all the answers. it is, like, well, if you don't have answers, why are you running for office? >> but flip it around, though. there has to be some -- to an elected official who sincerely believes in higher power, practices their faith, there has to be some civic value in that too,
africa. with in the religion of south africa, there has been so much to mull. -- tumult. catholic, what do you see for south africa as they try to move forward? this is a huge issue. >> nelson mandela was a huge, unifying figure. even in the last years of his life, he still helped people together. what will happen among these groups in the coming days and years will be critical. >> when you see south africa, do you perceive that religion still is front and center? i believe that he was in a methodist school coming out of the tribes way back. his religion still important there? >> i think that the anglican church still has a presence there. it can definitely play a role. >> part of the problem that they with his is within -- retreat from public life. politics has become much more better. much like america. much more tension and conflict. >> matt dowd is with us. michelle meyer, thank you for being with us. thank u so much for coming by on this historic day. let's do a forex report. we went conventional. markets are really moving. the euro is up. much more on "bloomberg surveillance." ♪
walks of life, all religion i don't knows, all colors and ages gather here. this is the south africa that nelson mandela dreamed of. >> talk a little bit about -- south afterdan people were so protective of nelson mandela, especially in his final days and now that his death is finally come there's so much planned after his death. what is is expecting in the coming days. >> . >> the military possibles are not saying exactly which one. notified by now of a need to make their plans in order to get here, in time for the funeral. they will be lying in state, which at the moment is supposed to only be one day, and that will be before opportunities to see him, to pay their respects in person after which his body is supposed to be transferred to the union in victoria, where there will be a state funeral that will televised by the board pass tor, so that everyone can be involved and hear the words. not only family members but all of the dig nit tears would be here, after which his body would be transferred to his home village. which is in the eastern cape. quite a rural area, and it would be
feel like the government is picking a religion and it's not theirs. >> well, there's things we can do about that to i guess lessen that offense. we can do that in the personal life. in my family we have the menorah out through december on our cich en take. i want to teach my children about the jewish faith. >> jon: quick word to the palin kids, while i appreciate the gesture, jews don't actually just leave a menorah out for the month of december. [cheers and applause] like a knickknack in a curio case. goes in the window and only put it there for eight days. palin kids this is not a menorah. now, there's got to be someone who can defend christmas with a little more authority. over the years we've taken on the role of protecting the federal holiday of christmas. >> jon: even though it's in in any way threatened. i'll bite. tell me why this year it's especially egregious to use the phrase happy holidays. >> what is interesting this year is hanukkah is over on thursday so there are no more holidays between then and christmas day. >> jon: damn you, o'reilly. [ laughter ] we've within chec
have to tell you that the idea of catholic charities, the charity work that our religion and other religions, it's a common goal to help poor and sick people. most of the religious in our countries today run hospitals, orphanages. and the idea that we have too much inequality out there, saying capitalism is okay, being rich is fine, but you have to focus on the people that don't have a piece of the action. it's not like he was running the creed here at all. >> he was talking about the idolatry of money, which i thought was a wonderful line. he talked about the globalization of indifference. this is what you want with the whole world catholic or not. somebody that gets them to think about fundamental issues and that returns them to the kinds of things that jesus did say, you know, according to catholici catholicism. so this is at the heart of modern ultra conservatism as represented be rush limbaugh. he said that the real evil is indifference as you just said so well. we'll be right back after this. commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our ener
's a religion. it was always an entirely white religion, the most important sport in south africa. the 1995 world rugby cup a warded to south africa for the ending of a par tide. it was still almost entirely whites in the sport. nelson mandela in the absolutely unthinkable act just a i few years before put on the jersey of the spring box what the rugby team is known as. they made it to the rugby world cup finals. they had no right to beat the strongest team in the world that they were playing that day, new zealand. nelson mandela stood in the stand. the atmosphere in the stands that day was the most extraordinary atmosphere. those that were there say that they have experienced. that team won the rugby world cup. that in a sense although sport ship, that is the moment south africa truly came together as a nation black and white. >> wow jonathan. i don't know about you but listening to you go through all of those things which at the time -- today looking back on them it's one thing. at the time we were living them that this man could speak on that field before those people and receive that so
it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper. some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world. and to future generations. you know, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet. but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my sweepeech yesterday, we live in a economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs, and we're rugged individuals. that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think i'm not going to be held back by conventions and traditions. i
of faith and religion. deeply religious. and yet, he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, it's like he couldn't understand it, he couldn't compute. but the last time i saw him, he was in a
in california not putting up decorations for christmas. instead the atheist group freedom from religion is putting up 55 billboards around sacramento. it is to promote her anti christian message during the month of december. >> i think there are a lot of myths out there about atheists that need to b broken. >> here's the irony despite her lack of christian faith she says she still has a christmas tree up and a charlie brown nativity scene. to her those are symbols of peace and joy. >> national security correspondent jennifer griffin explains why the defense department might get rid of the way military families save money on food. jennifer? >> heather, ainsley, the pentagon says no final decision has been made. defense cutter says more is on the table including a plan to close all u.s. based commissaries where they shop at reduced rate saving thousands on their grocery bills. it would affect 78 commissaries in the united states. they receive 1.4 billion in subsidies. but they don't tell the whole story. 30 percent of the employees are military spouses. there will likely be unemployment a
another person because of the color of his skin or background or religion. people must learn to hate and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite. "the washington post," a nation's healer is dead. the prisoner who became president, south african leader, was symbol of moral force. and in "time" protester, prisoner, peacemaker, nelson mandela, 1918-2013. joining me now for more on all of this is washington's -- joining me from washington is leela mcdowell, washington correspondent for arise tv, with nelson mandela when he was released from prison and i'm joined by ron allen who is leaving for south africa later this morning. thank you both for being here this morning. leela, i would like to start with you. you were a witness to history and had the privilege of meeting this iconic figure. what was that time like whe when mandela was released from prison and what was he like at that time in his life? >> it was a u forric time because it followed a long struggle, obviously, around the world to try to free thi
in need. >> that's the main fundamental of our religion is to share with the less fortunate. >>> two of the families that made the coat give away possible live in tracy, the third lives in union city. the families say this is their first give away in the bay area but it is their 15th give away in northern california. >>> a generous group of bay area bikers is helping children who will have to spend the holidays in the hospital. ktvu's alex savidge shows us what they dropped off today. >> reporter: thousands of harleys roared into the parking lot at san francisco general this morning. every rider here with a special delivery. they came bearing gifts. >> grab what you can. >> reporter: toys for the hospitals tiniest patients. >> yeah, right. >> reporter: the riders headed into the lobby to drop their donations under the christmas tree. steve polopolis knows how much these toys mean. his son was hospitalized here a few years back. >> when he was laying up they handed him a toy and i asked them, where did you get that. oh the harley guys dropped them off. it hit my heart and i never miss
or religion, whatever their nationality or ethnic group. >> thank you very much for joining us. former u.s. ambassador to south , helpingjendayi frazer us discuss nelson mandela, a global leader who will be missed. this is "taking stock" on bloomberg. ♪ >> this is "taking stock" on bloomberg. i am pimm fox. >robinson cano with a 10 year, $240 million deal with the seattle mariners. tom devere is not about baseball, it is about football. -- this time of year is about football. there is a daily alternative for downtrodden fans and gamers looking to make a little money. street.com, draft and barry stiller has taken notes. his company recently purchased draftstreet.com. former on the popularity of fantasy leagues, i am joined by their chief executive, brian schwartz. thank you. before you came on, you do not expect to be running a company that is doing fantasy sports when you were at the university of wisconsin madison, were you? >> nope. i knew that i would get into something digital, but fantasy sports was a dream i never thought would come true. >> you had been playing since the age of
by suppressing the freedom of religion. first of all, students theoretically have the same constitutional rights as the rest of us. that includes the freedom of speech and the free exercise of religion. this girl's not trying to have somebody celebrate mass in the hallway of the school. she's simply passing out literature saying if you'd like to talk about jesus or if you'd like to talk about the bible i'm happy to meet with you at another time and at another place. schools can restrain speech if the speech is disruptive. but when the speech is not disruptive and when it's especially protected in the constitution, like speech about religion or speech about nonreligion, they cannot interfere. >> here's the problem. the school has got a policy, and we got a statement from the school, quote, the distribution of any religious material is prohibited on school ground or in any attendance facility before, during or after the school day or school activity. so you say they've got that rule but that doesn't fly? >> that rule is unconstitutional unless they can show that the mere distribution of this lit l
is cheer about freedom of religion and i believe that extends to the private sector. there are numerous catholics that use birth control. so it comes down to does the catholic church care more about healing the sick or preventing birth control? >> they are asking for exe exemptions and if they don't believe that is ethical they should be able to offer a plan that is exempts contraception. >> mr. obama never mentioned he thought this was a problem and now in 2010 it is as a sign that the catholics don't love people. this is the problem with obamacare that has a one-size fits all. these problems didn't exist until obamacare was passed >> i don't think what the issue is with offering a version that employer feels doesn't violate their conscious? >> because then we get into an area of every single religious organization that is linked or every owner with a personal religious practice and if they are violated the first amendment. because birth role is provided doesn't mean everyone is choosing to use it. but there are other parts of the plan when it comes to women's health like ivf that are
no country from morocco to pakistan in which christians can freely practice their religion, end of quote. he continued, quote, there is a severe danger as we start to celebrate the feast of christmas in this country that all christianity will be almost completely erased from the traditional middle east holy land of the bible. mary to uld not take egypt because jesus would not have been safe there today. to follow on sir baldry's line of thinking, the patriarch abraham would also have a difficult time surviving in iraq having come from er, which is now nasiriyah. jonah would be hard pressed to make it to naviniva, which is now in the most you will area, and paul could scarcely travel the road to demascus in syria. the debate in the house of commons began with a staggering statistic, namely that one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. the focus of the commons debate was on the persecution of christians, several noted that whether or not you are a person of faith, all should be conc
on either race, ethnicity, religion, preference, any of the signs of bigotry have to be addressed and not. and i think it just takes time. we're learning. we are still evolving. we are a better country today than we were 20 years ago, 30 years ago. we still have a ways to go. >> when you cast that vote in 19 yivenlgs you can look back and say within four years nelson mandela is released. four years after that, democratic elections, he becomes the president. did you think history was going to play out like that in 1986? did you think the struggle was going to take longer than that? >> i had no idea. in fact, i had no way of knowing how nelson mandela once being freed would react. my wife and i had the opportunity to visit robben island and stand in his cell and look out into the courtyard where he spent so many years crushing rocks. i felt a sense of rage welling up inside of me having think nelson mandela having spent so many years in prison could come out and walk tall and straight and say that he wanted to seek rec sill dwrags. that's an extraordinary statement i had no way of knowing w
based on religion, that is bad news for the deposed muslim brotherhood and go to a referendum next year and elections will take place in six months and we are in cairo and basically we are hearing it will bolster the military's hand and the parties, are those the highlights? >> those are the highlights and there was one additional change that took place last night before the draft was finalized. originally the plan was to have the constitution put to referendum and parliamentary elections and they may hold both elections at the same time. for many this kind of change gives him a chance to run for the presidency, win it before the parliamentary elections but this is not the only controversy provision. many people especially from the opposition and followers of the muslim brotherhood are in a way dismissing the whole constitution. they are also angry that many of the provisions they have put in place in the past in the constitution they amended were actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel th
of marriage equality has had some people split from their religions. it seems as though it has strengthened your bond to ju judism? >> i really got to go into the subject and i found lots of lott with judaism and how it goes together really well. >> thank you very much for joining us tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> chris hayes is up next. ♪ i'm chris hayes. americans are back at work after a long holiday weekend, which means they're back at their computers. today, that means two things. shopping and health care. >> let's talk cyber monday! >> it is cyber monday! >> cyber monday. >> yes, it is cyber monday. >> cyber monday. >> cyber monday. >> it's expected to be a record-breaking day.
gender identity like race, sex and religion. >> it's a broad array of people whose gender identitity is different from their sex. >> reporter: a gender nonconformist. >> in the state of maryland, you are not protected on gender identity. what good is it if someone can fire me for looking the way i do but not who i love? >> reporter: they passed a bill that makes discrimination against the wall. >> hyattsville is the first jurisdiction to pass the legislation. >> reporter: it means people in the lgbt community in hyattsville can now go to a restaurant, get an apartment and know they are protected by law. >> four jurisdictions, montgomery county, baltimore county and the city of baltimore. >> reporter: currently, 16 states in d.c. have statewide nondiscrimination laws. they hope what's happening in hyattsville sends a message to state legislatures. >> i think it's a big help. the civil rights act didn't end racism. i don't think this is going to end homophobia or transphobia. >> reporter: zachary kiesch, news 4. >>> right now at 6:00, d.c. mayor vincent gray talks up his administration
the way we are. >> right. part of the resistance you are -- so much, many religions are based upon humans being different because we are self-aware, because we are the only ones supposedly can understand there is a past and a future and that we can reason. the reality is we now find many animals can do it. >> champ pans ease can reason and they know well what's going on in the past and they can anticipate the futuretion including a future in which they are held until solitary confinement. >> what about animals at nice zoos where they are kept comfortabley and pieces that are endangered and where the propagation of the species depends in many cases on these breeding programs in captivity? >> we are just talking about trained champ pans e right now who are in a private domain, in ma cement domain. >> is it okay to have them in a miami zoo or the san diego zoo? >> i don't know. i know that they should be in large social scrapes and cared for in a way that looks after their interests. >> that's the difference between a thing and a person. a thing is invezible and -- invisible and alive for th
reviewed. t all the secular folks just hammered it what's this religion at christmas time? it really is as you talked about. really not a war on christmas. it's a war on people of faith. >> that's right. >> this is a great little movie. it's wonderful for the people at christmas time. i really encourage people to see it. if you want to have it movie available for families at christmas, go out and see it this week. >> so it's christmas candle.com. >> the christmas candle.com. >> all right, senator, we appreciate it merry christmas to you. if you are mad as hell about something, we' put it on the air. we have got some very lively letters this evening. and then ms. megyn kelly on why she is so passionate about obama mayorca. al organized crime apparently moving into the legalized marijuana industry. we he hope you stay tuned to >>> mad as hell segment tonight where you guys sound off. we have five interesting letters. and here here to help us out with us gretchen carlson how you see at 2:00 p.m. every day. goodo see you. >> good to see you. >> no one else has ever said it's great to see
and propose religions for insuring -- propose recommendations. four white students taunted their black roommate with racial slurs and put a u-shaped bicycle lock around his neck. >>> healdsburg could be the first city to raise the minimum age for purchasing tobacco. you must be at least 21 years old to buy tobacco. that is up from 18 years old. its designed to discourage teens from buying tobacco and smoking at an earlier age but the city says they first need to investigate the low galty before they --ly galty before they --ly galty before they can vote on it. >>> tara moriarty is in san francisco with the build up to the big game this sunday. tara. >> reporter: the sea hawkers put an e-mail out to all of their fans telling them to meet here in san francisco in front of pier 39 to pose from font of their christmas tree and expecting 1,000 people. they also roll let's take over this place in classy sea hawk fashion. be respectful this is rival territory. we caught up with radio talk show to talk about the niners. they had interesting things to say about this handbook. its basically a ha
was a little boy that changed his life in terms of faith and religion. deeply religious, and yet he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, just, like, he could not understand it, he could not compute it, but the last time i saw him, he was in a relationship. he had a job. the person he's with has several chirp, so he was a step dad, and he seemed, if not happy, in a better place than when i met him. you know, time heals, sometimes. people move on. >> to assume this happens in our places too, so have you found anything? >> you know, one thing that i found while reporting this book, there was so much i didn't know; right? it's, like, anything, you know? writing a book is like getting a ph.d. on something. one thing i found out is that practically not one state has not had a hate crime against latinos, lately, but also his story going -- we have a pretty -- it's in the book. there's a whole chapter on that. we have a pretty dismal history in terms of hate crimes. w
political religion known as jujay. >> talk about the timing of this. it's interesting that merrill newman was released as vice biden arrives in south korea. >> for the moment we don't know much about the negotiations that went into freeing merrill newman. the vice president by himself said he was not involved in the negotiations to free merrill newman. biden being in asia when you have the vice president, it's easy to make those kind of connections. he was in sea. right now south korea and north korea are not talking. the other country could have been china. it's not clear if they were pressed to help. >> talk about the relations with the united states and north korea. will this impact that relationship. >> for the moment we can't tell. it's important to keep m mind that kenneth bae is still being held in north korea. it's a major contention between the states and north korea. what do the north koreans want? they want to engage with the yates and have bilateral talks. the americans are not willing to do so unless the north koreans will give up their nuclear program. that is something they
them an opportunity to intrude on religion, and what is to stoop them -- stop them from saying you have to cover abortion. that's why notre dame filed the lawsuit. >> are there students at notre dame that disagree with the lawsuit and think they ought to provide contraception? >> of course. of course. i've engaged other students and they're -- what they're saying is this is a matter of a woman's access to contraceptive coverage. one person engaged me and said contraception costs a lot of money. $200, and workers at notre dame don't make a lot of money so the university should cover it. but what we have to remember is that this isn't about a woman's access to contraception. this is about religious liberty, and notre dame maintaining its integrity. and not being compromised by the federal government. >> i think it's important to realize, when people say they're restricting access. they're not restricting access. they're determining who pays for it. >> exactly. >> i can go to a movie theater -- i have access to go, but i got to buy my own ticket. it's like if i want to see this movie in th
, it's more about that thanes the about some sort of traditional belief and religion. >> we can tell, we can see around you, people are mourning, but when you talk to them, what is the sense of loss? what are they mourning? >> reporter: they're of course mourning nelson mandela, but mandela was like a mirror, he reflected back to south africa, what they want to be, what this nation imagined itself to be. perhaps an idealistic vision, an complicated often -- very visionary leadership we saw in mandel l.a. you spoke about it a little bit earlier. he really played the long game, didn't he? he looked ahead, he planned, he was a man who really thought about being a symbol of rec reconciliati reconciliation. now compare that to president zuma whose leadership and whose government seems to lurch from crisis to crisis, there seems to be an overwhelming focus on scandals or the personal enrichment whether it's linked to president zuma or those close to him. according to many south africans there's a real current in this current government of the trappings of power, of using the state to furth
by the hundreds. each day we see the rainbow that is the new south africa. people of all religions, all colors, all united in their affection for this one man, nelson mandela. nelson mandela was not a particularly religious man. today in churches and houses of worship across south africa, prayers and songs for the man who had an abiding faith in the human spirit and in his nation, to move beyond apartheid. >> to keep his legacy going, we need to keep living what he's set out for us. >> he was a hero. he fought for us. he suffered for the whole world. >> reporter: the mood here remains more celebratory than somber. overnight, the family spokesman spoking to the media frp the first time, with mandela's grandson close by. >> in our hearts and souls, he will always be with us. >> reporter: today's national day of prayer kicks off a week-long celebration. next up, a memorial service on tuesday, taking place at the fnb stadium in johannesburg. mandela made his last public appearance at the 2010 world cup. it's confirmed, president obama and the first lady will be there, along with former president g
where they are from, no matter their race or religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> nelson mandela did not pretend to be a saint and the coverage has taken note of some of his mistakes but and he was symbol, a courageous are moral leader, the coverage can barely convey. >> everyone prize themselves on scoring points for one side or another. it was nice to see a story for once where the "new york post," "new york times," mother jones everyone was in agreement that we lost a great man. that was refreshing. >> there's been a little bit of point scoring. "huffington post" put up how right let nelson mandela down. but there does seem to be an absence of cynicism and everybody feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> can i just say, even on twitter, i think we're not used -- we forgot about the time when there was no snark and have a conversation and say he was a great person. it was interesting to see some of the old coverage dusted off, like this weekend interview with dick cheney he s
traditional belief in religion. >> we can see around you people are mourning, but when you talk to them, what is the sense of loss? what are they mourning? >> reporter: you know, they are, of course, mourning nelson mandela, but just remember mandela was like a mirror. he reflected back to south africa what they wanted to be, what this nation imagined itself to be. perhaps an idealistic vision. today 20 years later, this is a very complicated, often divided at times nation. now, what they also i think are mourning is that very vision of leadership we saw in mandela. you spoke about it a little earlier. he really played the long he? he looked ahead. he planned. he was a tactician, a pragmatist. he was a man who really thought about being a symbol of reconciliation. compare that with president zuma whose leadership and whose government seems to lurch from crisis to crisis. there seems to be an overwhelming focus on scandals over personal enrichment, whether it's president zuma or those close to him. they seem to have according to many south africans, there is a real focus of this current gover
races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go around the corner and you are more than welcome to buy take-aways. >> their kids have no idea what their parents went through, which is just fine for them. >> tell me about these. >> perussia shows off achievements she wasn't allowed to dream. her kids graduated from integrated colleges. one is a doctor, the other training to be a teacher. >> it's an awesome feel to go have brought up children in the multi-r
, their religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> he did not pretend to be 10 saint. coverage has taken note mistakes but he was such a courageous moral leader and a symbol the coverage can barely convey his legacy. what struck you most about the continuing coverage leading up to this? >> it was refreshing we live in an age where everyone prides himself on scoring points for one side or another and the media is increasingly partisan and polarized and it was nice to see a story where new york post and "new york times" and mother jones believed the world left one of the greatest men ever. >> this is legitimate debate about apartheid in the 80's but there is an absence of cynicism and snarking and everyone feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> even on twitter, we are not used to us, we have forgotten when there was no snark and quote have a conversation and say we are sad, he was great person and it was refreshing to see that. not just the old coverage dusted off like the interview with dick cheney
, citizens young and old, of all races religions say mandela created that unity. at an inter faith service, south africans celebrated opportunities and respect that mandela provided thed them. >> it allows us to be united and proud of. down the road at an indian rally, perussia thanked mandela on behalf of changes. she was a second class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks? >> we were part of the deprived lot. her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to buy something to eat. and we had to say to the guy, sorry. do you serve us? he would say, no. we don't serve nomads but go around the corner and you are more than welcome to buy take-aways? >> their kids have no idea what their parents went through which is just fine for them. >> tell me about these photos. >> perussia shows off what she wasn't allowed to dream. one child is a doctor, the other training to be a teacher? >> it's an awesome feeling to have brought up children in the multi-racial education society and they have proved that they can mak
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